ShanDaph Oysters

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Are you a university student returning to school in the fall?

  • Introduction:  ShanDaph Aquaculture is an environmentally sustainable, organic aquaculture operation, located in Big Island, Nova Scotia. The boutique operation grows primarily oysters, as well as bay scallops and quahogs, in the Northumberland Strait waters of Atlantic Canada. Located on Big Island, Nova Scotia, ShanDaph focuses on providing consistently high quality, fresh shellfish. Only the plumpest, tastiest shellfish with consistent size and shape are harvested for an exciting gourmet experience.   ShanDaph promotes environmentally sound practices. Shellfish are grown from seed and harvested in a natural setting. They are packaged onsite in a Federally-registered, solar-powered facility, the only one in Atlantic Canada.

  • Marine Biology or Environmental Engineering Student: Seeking one full-time employee. From May 2017 – August 25, 2017. Hourly Wage: 40 hours/week; $15/hour.

  • Job Description:  1. This position will entail a keen willingness to be outdoors, on the water, and involved in all aspects of shellfish husbandry and harvesting;   2. Further, the student will be required to swim for shellfish, harvest from a boat, de-foul shellfish, sort, tumbling and grading oysters;   3. The husbandry component involves managing various shellfish grow out apparatus and determining best husbandry practice for optimal growth. A detailed plan will developed and completed during position;     4. Various environmental monitoring for temperature and salinity measurement readings will be required as part of a pH monitoring and MSX hatchery project ShanDaph Aquaculture is a part of;   5. The incumbent, based on skill set will be required to build and repair husbandry and growth equipment as required.    6. A willingness to adjust weekly work hours based on the tides and activities being carried out on the farm.    
     
  • Background and Qualifications:   1. Student in the field of Marine Biology, Environmental Engineering or other similar fields.    2. The ability to be outdoors in a wet environment, for majority of the day.   3. A strong swimmer with a willingness to snorkel.    4. A Nova Scotia boating license.    5. An independent worker who can autonomously complete tasks.   

  • Position for one high school student also available. 
  • Send your interests to Philip@shandaph.com


About Us


ShanDaph Oysters was established in May of 1999, but its roots reach back over thirty years.Owner/Operator Philip Docker’s grandparents helped to reestablish the growing and the harvesting of oysters on the pristine shores of Big Island, Nova Scotia. Over the decades, the native oyster seed they set in the 1960s and 1970s has matured into productive oyster beds.ShanDaphs are housed in growout units suspended in a water column, where they feed on the nutrient-rich waters of the ShanDaph farm. By completing the growth process suspended in the rich tidal waters of Big Island, ShanDaph ensures optimum growth conditions from the time they are set at less than a millimeter in size, to harvest at over 76 millimeters in size. The total process takes between three to five years.

By 1999 the first oysters were set and ShanDaph Oysters was born.Since then, the enterprise has grown steadily without compromise to the premium quality of its product, and ShanDaph Oysters have been served in fine dining establishments, presented by organizations hosting special events, and ordered by individual connoisseurs.And what about that name? ShanDaph Oysters is Philip’s tribute to his family and their love and respect of the water and its “oysters”. ShanDaph is a combination of Philip’s grandparents’ names. ‘Shan’ is derived from the WWII pilot flight name of Everett (Shan) Baudoux, and ‘Daph’ from Daphne Baudoux.

FAQ


1. What is the difference between cultured and naturally harvested oysters?

2. Can I put oysters in the freezer?

3. Are oysters only edible in months containing the letter “r”?

Simply answered, cultured and naturally occurring oysters feed on the same nutrients, but cultured oysters are often provided with a superior growing environment by means of bottom preparation, racks or floating/suspended growth units, which lends to a fuller oyster.

Yes, but once frozen, they are no longer living and should be eaten within three months. Allow 50 minutes to defrost them and cook them immediately.

No, but during non-‘r’ months, the meat of the oyster is not as full, therefore the quality of the meat is not as good.

4. What nutritional value do oysters have?

5. How did ShanDaph Oysters get its name?

6. How can I tell if an oyster is spoiled?

Oysters are rich in iron, zinc, vitamins and minerals. A single oyster contains just seven calories and is an excellent source of protein.

ShanDaph Oysters is Philip’s tribute to his family and their long standing ties to Big Island and its oysters. ShanDaph is a combination of Philip’s grandparents’ names. ‘Shan’ derived from the WWII pilot flight name of Everett (Shan) Baudoux and ‘Daph’ from Daphne Baudoux.

If there is a strong, pungent smell coming from an oyster, simply discard it. Note: ShanDaph Oysters are packed by hand and special care is taken to prevent inclusion of such oysters.

1. What is the difference between cultured and naturally harvested oysters?

Simply answered, cultured and naturally occurring oysters feed on the same nutrients, but cultured oysters are often provided with a superior growing environment by means of bottom preparation, racks or floating/suspended growth units, which lends to a fuller oyster.

2. Can I put oysters in the freezer?

Yes, but once frozen, they are no longer living and should be eaten within three months. Allow 50 minutes to defrost them and cook them immediately.

3. Are oysters only edible in months containing the letter “r”?

No, but during non-‘r’ months, the meat of the oyster is not as full, therefore the quality of the meat is not as good.

4. What nutritional value do oysters have?

Oysters are rich in iron, zinc, vitamins and minerals. A single oyster contains just seven calories and is an excellent source of protein.

5. How did ShanDaph Oysters get its name?

ShanDaph Oysters is Philip’s tribute to his family and their long standing ties to Big Island and its oysters. ShanDaph is a combination of Philip’s grandparents’ names. ‘Shan’ derived from the WWII pilot flight name of Everett (Shan) Baudoux and ‘Daph’ from Daphne Baudoux.

6. How can I tell if an oyster is spoiled?

If there is a strong, pungent smell coming from an oyster, simply discard it. Note: ShanDaph Oysters are packed by hand and special care is taken to prevent inclusion of such oysters.

contact us


For all out of province sales & inquiries. Contact Philip.

ShanDaph Oysters

RR #1 Merigomish Big Island, Nova Scotia B0K 1G0

tel: (902) 928-8581